An Atheist’s Flowchart, Part 5: The Psychology of Belief

The third and final pillar of my atheistic treatise is the one I called “via explanation” way back in January. Whereas the first two pillars were pretty explicitly philosophical, this one tends to feel a bit more scientific. It actually comes from a counter-argument that I heard once from a theist, which went (very briefly) something like this: If god doesn’t exist, then how do you explain the millions of people who believe in him?

Different theists have made a bunch of variations on this argument over the years, but this particular one struck me because it’s actually a fairly empirical argument. It is uncontroversial that there are millions (arguably billions) of believers in god. While the act of believing in and of itself does not prove anything, the fact of the belief itself requires explanation and “god actually exists” could potentially be the simplest explanation of that fact. This argument is weakened somewhat up front by the fact that god is a terrible explanation for things in general, but it’s at least plausible on its face.

The true counter, and the heart of my third pillar, is the fact that science does in fact have an excellent explanation for why people believe in god. And that linked book was published over fifteen years ago; science has continued to clarify more pieces of the puzzle since then.

So. How does this become not just a counter, but an actual self-supporting argument for atheism? The transformation happens because you pretty much have to believe in science, and when you believe in science you get this full explanation “for free”. With this explanation in hand then, it would be incredibly weird for god to actually exist, but for people to believe in him for unrelated reasons. That kind of coincidence boggles the mind, and not in a blind watchmaker sort of way.

By way of analogy, imagine, if you will, a mouse that has been placed into a totally isolated box and injected with a mysterious serum. The serum causes the mouse to develop human-level intelligence out of nowhere, but of course the mouse cannot see, smell, or hear anything outside of its special box. What are the odds that the mouse, through pure invention, manages to end up believing in an outside world even remotely similar to the real one? That of all the infinity of possible worlds imaginable by a mouse, it actually chooses the right one without any input whatsoever?

We are all the mouse, and we have every reason to believe that the gods we’ve constructed in our minds are nothing more than the spandrels of psychology.

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One thought on “An Atheist’s Flowchart, Part 5: The Psychology of Belief

  1. Pingback: Wrapping up on God – Final Notes and Errata on “An Atheist’s Flowchart” | Grand Unified Crazy

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